Combat lifesaver course teaches lifesaving battlefield skills

U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Schiller and U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Alasdair Stretch participate in the hands on portion of the Combat Lifesavers Course (CLC) at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 19, 2017. The CLC is a 40-hour course centered on the three different phases of tactical combat casualty care: care under fire, tactical field care and casualty evacuation care. Combat lifesaver course teaches lifesaving battlefield skills U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael Schiller and U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Alasdair Stretch participate in the hands on portion of the Combat Lifesavers Course (CLC) at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 19, 2017. The CLC is a 40-hour course centered on the three different phases of tactical combat casualty care: care under fire, tactical field care and casualty evacuation care.
Students from U.S. partner nations take a written examination during the Combat Lifesavers Course (CLC) at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 19, 2017. A properly trained combat lifesaver is capable of stabilizing many types of casualties and can slow the deterioration of a wounded service member’s condition until medical personnel arrive. Combat lifesaver course teaches lifesaving battlefield skills Students from U.S. partner nations take a written examination during the Combat Lifesavers Course (CLC) at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 19, 2017. A properly trained combat lifesaver is capable of stabilizing many types of casualties and can slow the deterioration of a wounded service member’s condition until medical personnel arrive.
U.S. Army Sgt. Ashley Jones, medic, applies a simulated bullet wound on a student for a class exercise during the Combat Lifesavers Course (CLC) at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 19, 2017. The CLC instructs students on emergency medical procedures that can reduce preventable deaths on the battlefield. Combat lifesaver course teaches lifesaving battlefield skills U.S. Army Sgt. Ashley Jones, medic, applies a simulated bullet wound on a student for a class exercise during the Combat Lifesavers Course (CLC) at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 19, 2017. The CLC instructs students on emergency medical procedures that can reduce preventable deaths on the battlefield.

The 418th Civil Affairs Battalion and the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) medical surgeon cell at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti conducted a Combat Lifesaver Course (CLC) Jan. 16-20, 2017.

 

The CLC instructs non-medical service members on emergency medical procedures as a secondary mission with the purpose of reducing preventable deaths on the battlefield.

“The combat lifesaver course is a vital tool that provides non-medical [personnel] the training needed to provide lifesaving measures beyond the level of self-aid or buddy aid,” said Sgt. 1st Class Fallicia Keith, medic and senior instructor. “The course prepares and trains CJTF-HOA's U.S military and partner nation service members to provide emergency lifesaving measures.”

 

The 40-hour course is centered on the three different phases of tactical combat casualty care: care under fire, tactical field care and casualty evacuation care.  It is a blended classroom and hands-on training given by certified combat medics.

 

“This course instructs military members on how to treat injuries, how to send up the appropriate radio messages using proper edict and the most effective, efficient ways to remove a patient from the combat zone,” said Sgt. Ashley Jones, medic and instructor for the CLC. “In the course we teach what is happening inside the body when injuries occur and the proper treatment for those injuries. Students will learn how to use tourniquets, maintain airways, perform needle chest decompressions, and utilize Combat Gauze appropriately.” Jones said.

 

While service members are on combat missions the availability of medical care may be limited.  Survival may be dependent on the skills of the individual military member.


“Class graduates will be able to clearly and quickly identify and channel up all medical emergencies. Quick life-saving skills help stabilize patients until they can reach more advanced care.” Jones said.


A properly trained combat lifesaver is capable of stabilizing many types of casualties and can slow the deterioration of a wounded personnel's condition until medical personnel arrive.
 

“Everything that we teach for basic practical skills, have been learned from WWI to Desert Storm,” said Sgt. Jones “The Combat Lifesavers course will help ensure every method taught will be utilized to save the lives we can, and bring our brothers, and sisters home.”

On the final day, students take a written exam.  After the exam, they respond to mock scenarios that test their new skill set.  Upon successful completion of the course, the service member is certified for one year and an annual recertification is required. 

Tags

We suggest

CJTF-HOA works with Marines, French in Alligator Dagger

Alligator Dagger, led by Naval Amphibious Force, Task Force 51/5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade, is a dedicated, bilateral combat rehearsal that combines U.S. and French forces to practice, rehearse and exercise integrated capabilities available to U.S. Central Command both afloat and ashore.

Sgt. Maj. of the Army Dailey visits service members at Camp Lemonnier

U.S. Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel Dailey stopped by Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, before returning to the United States from his trip to visit with Soldiers and other service members deployed and away from their families during the holidays.

CJTF-HOA Commander Visits with Troops During Holiday Season

U.S. Marine Corps Brig. Gen. David J. Furness, commander of Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa, and U.S. Air Force Command Chief Master Sgt. Benjamin J. Higginbotham, command senior enlisted leader of CJTF-HOA, visited with troops in Chebelley, Djibouti, Dec. 25, 2017. The leaders spent the afternoon meeting with service members and thanking them for their continued service and sacrifice during the holiday season and throughout their deployments.

CJTF-HOA Site Security Team conducts medical training

For reconnaissance team members, it’s important to be able stabilize and move wounded Soldiers back to friendly lines. CJTF-HOA Soldiers took time to practice those skills in a Combat Lifesaver training event.

AFCENT Band Builds Cultural Bridge in Balbala

The U.S. Air Forces Central Command (AFCENT) Band, in cooperation with the U.S. Embassy in Djibouti, performed for the Balbala E-Learning Center in Djibouti City, Djibouti, Jan. 10, 2018.