U.S. Soldiers prepare Kenyan army to teach counter-IED procedures

NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO)  †U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Brendan Mcevoy uses a map of a small town, toy cars and soldiers to explain counter-improvised-explosive-device procedures to a group of East African service members at the Humanitarian Peace Support School in Kenya March 30, 2011.  Mcevoy was part of a team sent to Nairobi to share counter IED practices used by the United States military with the Kenyans, who will use the knowledge to train their own military and allied forces. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May) CJTF-HOA Photo NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO) †U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Brendan Mcevoy uses a map of a small town, toy cars and soldiers to explain counter-improvised-explosive-device procedures to a group of East African service members at the Humanitarian Peace Support School in Kenya March 30, 2011. Mcevoy was part of a team sent to Nairobi to share counter IED practices used by the United States military with the Kenyans, who will use the knowledge to train their own military and allied forces. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May)
NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO)  †U.S. Army Sergeant Jerry Kastein helps Kenyan air force Senior Private Rob Bagaja Hassan get in position during a counter-improvised-explosive-device drill March 30, 2011. Soldiers from various East African nations, including Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and Sudan attended the week-long class, taught mostly by Kenyan soldiers, to learn counter-IED practices currently utilized by U.S. service members in combat theaters. Kastein was part of a team sent to Nairobi to share their experiences and training with the Kenyans, who will use the knowledge to instruct their own military and allied forces. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May) CJTF-HOA Photo NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO) †U.S. Army Sergeant Jerry Kastein helps Kenyan air force Senior Private Rob Bagaja Hassan get in position during a counter-improvised-explosive-device drill March 30, 2011. Soldiers from various East African nations, including Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and Sudan attended the week-long class, taught mostly by Kenyan soldiers, to learn counter-IED practices currently utilized by U.S. service members in combat theaters. Kastein was part of a team sent to Nairobi to share their experiences and training with the Kenyans, who will use the knowledge to instruct their own military and allied forces. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May)
NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO) -- A group of East African service members practice dismounted counter-improvised-explosive-device operations at the Humanitarian Peace Support School in Kenya March 30, 2011.  The group was comprised of students from a week-long counter-IED course taught by the Kenyan army and assisted by members of the U.S. Army and a team from Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May) CJTF-HOA Photo NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO) -- A group of East African service members practice dismounted counter-improvised-explosive-device operations at the Humanitarian Peace Support School in Kenya March 30, 2011. The group was comprised of students from a week-long counter-IED course taught by the Kenyan army and assisted by members of the U.S. Army and a team from Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May)
NAIROBI, Kenya - U.S. Army Sergeant Jerry Kastein observes Kenyan army Corporal Samson Kiriungi set up a small C-4 charge for detonation during the final portion of a week-long counter-improvised-explosive-device course taught by the Kenyan Army and assisted by members of the U.S. Army and a team from Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance.  The demolition charges were completely rigged by the students, and the successful deployment of the explosives instilled a sense of confidence in the skills they acquired during the course. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May) CJTF-HOA Photo NAIROBI, Kenya - U.S. Army Sergeant Jerry Kastein observes Kenyan army Corporal Samson Kiriungi set up a small C-4 charge for detonation during the final portion of a week-long counter-improvised-explosive-device course taught by the Kenyan Army and assisted by members of the U.S. Army and a team from Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance. The demolition charges were completely rigged by the students, and the successful deployment of the explosives instilled a sense of confidence in the skills they acquired during the course. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May)
NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO) -- Kenyan army Sergeant Peter Wachira monitors Burundi army Warrant Officer Celestin Nzisabira as he crimps a timed fuse to a blasting cap during a confidence-building explosives class April 1, 2011.  The class was the final portion of a week-long counter-improvised-explosive-device course taught by the Kenyan Army and assisted by members of the U.S. Army and a team from Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May) CJTF-HOA Photo NAIROBI, Kenya (CJTF-HOA PAO) -- Kenyan army Sergeant Peter Wachira monitors Burundi army Warrant Officer Celestin Nzisabira as he crimps a timed fuse to a blasting cap during a confidence-building explosives class April 1, 2011. The class was the final portion of a week-long counter-improvised-explosive-device course taught by the Kenyan Army and assisted by members of the U.S. Army and a team from Africa Contingency Operations Training & Assistance. (AFRICOM photo by Staff Sgt. Austin M. May)

A team of U.S. Army soldiers from Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa recently concluded a month-long operation teamed with the Kenyan army to develop a counter-improvised-explosive-device training program for East African militaries.

Drawing on their own experiences and training, the three-man team partnered with soldiers from the Kenyan army to share information with four classes of service members from several East African nations including Kenya, Rwanda, Burundi, Sudan, Comoros and Uganda.

“When we first started, the student instructors didn’t know what the term IED stood for,” said U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Joshua Moore, mission commander. “But by the time we were finished, they were teaching the classes pretty much entirely on their own. We were able to sit back and only assist if needed.”

According to Moore, the initial class was comprised of 20 Kenyan soldiers, eight of whom were selected to remain at the training facility to teach their fellow Africans the curriculum. After the first week, each class was made up of about 45 soldiers from various branches of each nation’s military. Each week also saw the Kenyan instructors leading more of the instruction.

The course, which was held at the Humanitarian Peace Support School in Nairobi, consisted of five days of learning, half of which was spent in an academic environment and the other half conducting practical exercises. Initially, the students learned to identify an improvised explosive device and took an abbreviated first aid course focusing on wounds commonly suffered in IED attacks, Moore said.

As the week progressed, the focus shifted to foot patrols and vehicle-borne operations, IED recognition, reaction procedures and basic demolition. As a culmination to the course, the students prepared and employed a small, simple explosive charge.

“The purpose of the demolition was to allow them to see how the skills they learned really do work,” Moore said.

In total 149 African service members had graduated the course. The lessons they learned could potentially save hundreds, if not thousands of lives, Moore said, adding, “In today’s warfare IEDs are becoming a huge threat because they’re extremely cheap and effective. So it’s important for every army to learn counter-IED procedures.”

Tags

U.S. Army Kenya Rwanda Comoros Training

We suggest

U.S., Rwanda forces complete first of four phases to enhance Rwanda peacekeeping operations

Civil affairs and information operations personnel from CJTF-HOA met with members of the Rwanda Defence Force to discuss capabilities and pre-deployment tasks for Rwandan CIMIC personnel.

Eye in the sky: Task Force Hurricane teaches Kenya Defense Forces how to fly

Members of Task Force Hurricane, 1st Battalion, 124th Infantry Regiment, are conducting unmanned aerial vehicle training with members of the Kenya Defense Forces Sept. 8-24, 2016, at a training center in Kenya.

Kenyan Soldiers Train, Prepare for Civil Affairs Mission

Nineteen Kenyan Army engineers from multiple units finished a five-day civil affairs field training exercise at the Amani Peace Operations Training Village in Embakasi, Kenya, October 21.

The soldiers participated in a series of scenarios designed and implemented by an instruction team made up of seven engineers from the Kenyan Army and facilitated by five U.S. Army soldiers from the 402nd Civil Affairs Battalion attached to Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. The exercise cove

AFRICOM, Rwandan Soldiers Promote Regional Stability with Training Exchange

U.S. soldiers attached to Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) have recently supported a series of missions to exchange soldiering skills with their Rwandan Defense Force (RDF) counterparts and fellow partner nation members June 30, 2001, in Gako, Rwanda.

The U.S. soldiers, assigned to the 1st Battalion 161st Field Artillery (1-161 FA), a Kansas Army National Guard unit, provided their expertise and advice if requested, said U.S. Army Major Michael McCoy, a mission comma

CJTF-HOA Conducts Peace Operations Course in Kenya

The commander and deputy commander of Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) attended the graduation ceremony of 32 military officers from nine East African countries who successfully completed the Peace Operations Staff Course conducted by CJTF-HOA.

U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Anthony M. Kurta, Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa's commander, and U.S. Army Brigadier General Chris Leins, deputy commander, visited the International Peace Support Training Centre (IPSTC